News Flash

City of Minot News Flash

Posted on: February 16, 2021

Asphalt recycler gives City options

The City of Minot is getting into the asphalt business. Well, sort of.

The City Council approved the purchase of a KMT2 asphalt recycler, which will allow City’s street department to produce its own hot mix asphalt for small projects – like potholes.

City of Minot Street Superintendent Kevin Braaten said the City is involved in several projects every year where the asphalt surface of a roadway is stripped off and turned into millings. The millings, stored in a pile at the Public Works complex, are used to repair alleys and other spots, he said.

“With this recycler we can put those millings in a hopper and use high heat to melt it back down to a product that is a little thicker than the hot mix we use, but better,” Braaten said. “In the spring and fall, we have to use pothole mixes because we don’t have access to hot mix when the asphalt plants close. Now, we can make our own asphalt.”

The recycler can make about three tons of hot mix at a time; not enough for large projects, but perfect for filling potholes and doing other small jobs.

The machine, which sits on a trailer and looks something like a smaller version of a rotating concrete mixer, can produce recycled asphalt hot mix at a cheaper cost.

“We pay roughly $75 for a ton of hot mix asphalt, and we’ll be able to produce a ton of recycled hot mix using our own millings for between $20 and $25 per ton,” Braaten said.

The City will still use regular hot mix asphalt for large projects and during the typical construction season, and will continue to use Omegamix and Aquaphalt for some potholes and other small jobs. But the new piece of equipment gives the City options.

“We had a demonstration last fall of a machine similar to the one we’re purchasing,” Braaten said. “We felt we could utilize this equipment and use our existing stack of recycling millings to produce a quality product for smaller jobs. It felt like a smart way to do things for the City.”

Braaten said he expects the machine, which cost just over $87,000, to be delivered early this spring, with plans to have it set up and running in time for pothole season.

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